Randolph Police Investigating Motor Vehicle Crash after Armed Robbery

Randolph Police Department
William Pace, Police Chief
41 South Main St.
Randolph, MA 02368

For Immediate Release

Wednesday, Jan. 17, 2018

Contact: Benjamin Paulin
Phone: 781-428-3299
Email: ben@jgpr.net

Randolph Police Investigating Motor Vehicle Crash after Armed Robbery

This is breaking news. Additional information will be provided when it is available. Media should stage at the Randolph Police Department, 41 South Main St.

RANDOLPH — Commander John Hamelburg reports that the Randolph Police Department is investigating a serious motor vehicle crash that is believed to be connected to an armed robbery that occurred earlier Wednesday afternoon.

At approximately 3 p.m., a suspect walked into Super Mart, located at 1151 North Main St., armed with a sawed-off shotgun and demanding money from the clerk. During the robbery, the suspect fired the shotgun into the floor of the store. No one was injured, and the store clerk was the only other person in the store at the time of the incident. The suspect escaped by vehicle with a quantity of cash.

Randolph Police broadcast a description of the suspect and of a blue 2009 Pontiac G6 sedan. Shortly afterward, the Holbrook Police Department located a vehicle matching the description given over the air being driven by a man matching the description given of the robbery suspect.

Holbrook Police attempted to stop the vehicle, but the driver fled, leading police on a pursuit from Holbrook and eventually back into Randolph. At approximately 4:30 p.m., the pursuit ended when the suspect crashed head-on into another vehicle near 306 Union St.

The suspect sustained serious, life-threatening injuries and was taken to an area hospital.

The male driver of the other vehicle was transported to an area hospital with injuries that are not believed to be life threatening.

This is a breaking news update. This situation is being actively investigated by the Randolph Police Department and the Norfolk County District Attorney’s Office has been requested to the scene.

Anyone with information about this incident is asked to call the Randolph Police Department at 781-963-1212.

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Randolph Police Department Shares Ice Dam and Snow Removal Safety Tips for Residents

Randolph Police Department
William Pace, Police Chief
41 South Main St.
Randolph, MA 02368

For Immediate Release

Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018

Contact: Benjamin Paulin
Phone: 781-428-3299
Email: ben@jgpr.net

Randolph Police Department Shares Ice Dam and Snow Removal Safety Tips for Residents

RANDOLPH — After last week’s heavy snowfall and with warmer temperatures expected over the next several days, Chief William Pace would like to advise Randolph residents on how they can safely handle snow removal from roofs and avoid damage from ice dams.

With some areas experiencing over a foot of snow, it is important for property owners, managers and tenants to have snow and ice cleared from their roofs before any future rain or snowfall.

While removing snow, residents should be cognizant of the dangers that come with heavy snow loads and the importance of recognizing signs of structural weakness. Flat and low pitched roofs are at the highest risk of buckling under heavy snow and ice accumulations, however many risks posed by heavy snowfall on roofs can be avoided by safely removing the snow.

With temperatures expected to reach around 50 degrees by the end of this week, residents should also be wary of snow that has accumulated around gutters, as it could contribute to ice dams and damage from water leaking into walls, ceilings, insulation and other areas.

“With the snow beginning to melt from last week’s blizzard, we want to ensure that residents stay safe and keep their property protected,” Chief Pace said. “The following tips can help people to recognize potential problems with their roofs.”

The following safety tips from the Massachusetts Department of Public Safety (DPS), the Department of Fire Services (DFS) and the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) outline how to safely remove snow from roofs, recognize structural damage and other important safety information.

HOW TO REMOVE SNOW FROM ROOFS

  • Consider hiring snow removal professionals. The combination of height and ice can make removing snow from roofs dangerous. If you decide to perform the task yourself, make sure you have someone with you to assist.
  • Use a snow rake to remove snow from pitched roofs and start from the edge.
  • Try to shave the snow down 2 or 3 inches on the roof instead of scraping the roof clean which could damage shingles or other roof covering.
  • Keep all ladders, roof rakes and shovels away from utility wires.
  • Plastic shovels are usually the best as metal tools may cause damage to your roof.
  • Shovel snow from flat roofs by throwing the snow over the side and away from the building.
  • Remove large icicles carefully if they’re hanging over doors and walkways. Consider knocking down icicles through windows using a broomstick.
  • Protect gas and electric meters and piping from falling snow, icicles and melting water.
  • Keep gutters and drains clean, free of ice and snow and keep downspouts clean at ground level

DO NOT

  • Do not add your weight or the weight of equipment to the roof.
  • Do not use a ladder, as ice tends to build up on both the rungs of the ladder and the soles of your boots.
  • Do not use blow torches, open-flame, electric heating devices, or heat guns to remove snow and ice.
  • Do not try to remove ice or icicles from utility wires or meters. Call your utility company for assistance.

HOW TO RECOGNIZE PROBLEMS WITH ROOFS

  • Sagging roofs
  • Severe roof leaks
  • Cracked or split wood members
  • Bends or ripples in supports
  • Cracks in walls or masonry
  • Sheared off screws from steel frames
  • Sprinkler heads that have dropped down below ceiling tiles
  • Doors that pop open
  • Doors or windows that are difficult to open
  • Bowed utility pipes or conduit attached at ceiling
  • Creaking, cracking or popping sounds

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Randolph Police Officer Kevin Gilbert Recognized for Selfless Efforts Beyond the Call of Duty

Randolph Police Department
William Pace, Police Chief
41 South Main St.
Randolph, MA 02368

For Immediate Release

Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018

Contact: John Guilfoil
Phone: 617-993-0003
Email: john@jgpr.net

Randolph Police Officer Kevin Gilbert Recognized for Selfless Efforts Beyond the Call of Duty

On Duty and Off Shift, Officer Gilbert Consistently Goes the Extra Mile for his Fellow Citizens

RANDOLPH — The main reason Kevin Gilbert became a police officer was to help others. Consistently, while on duty and on his own time, Officer Gilbert has been the living embodiment of service and selflessness.

For the reasons outlined below and many other untold examples, the Randolph Police Department recently awarded Officer Gilbert a commendation, and the department is sharing his story with the public so that they too will know and understand just how far police officers like Officer Gilbert go for their fellow man.

When he leaves work at the end of his shift, Officer Gilbert constantly scours social media and news headlines for people who are in need that he may be able to help.

His efforts have helped many people at home and in places as far away as Georgia and Tennessee. Officer Gilbert has sent care packages to sick children in hospitals. If a sick child has siblings, he buys them toys and other gifts, because he understands that the siblings suffer too. He buys the parents gift cards for gas to help them get back and forth to the hospital. All of this comes out of his own pocket.

Last month, Officer Gilbert found a post on Facebook about a local family in need and bought toys for the children and arranged to have them given to their parents to put under the tree for Christmas morning.

“Officer Gilbert is a shining example of the community policing we do here in Randolph,” Chief William Pace said. “He has only been with the department for three years and his impact in town has already been felt by many.”

Recently, his commanding officer, Sgt. Douglas Morgan wrote a letter of commendation to Chief Pace making him aware of some of the great things Officer Gilbert has been doing in his free time.

“I was present on a call with Officer Gilbert where a mother had shoplifted some food at [a local pharmacy]. She was a single mother, money was tight, and she was trying to provide for her daughter,” Sgt. Morgan wrote. “Officer Gilbert went back into the store and paid for enough food for a couple of days out of his own pocket until her social security check came.”

Officer Gilbert says he learned to help others from his parents growing up in Randolph and while he was training at the police academy in Boston.

“As a police officer making an arrest is one thing in the course of our duties, but by sending a letter and gift with a police patch to a sick child in the hospital, you can do the most with that,” Officer Gilbert said. “I’m certainly not the only officer in our department who does it, but it’s always nice to be able to help whenever we can.”

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Randolph Police Remind Residents to Remain Safe and Sober While Driving This New Year’s Weekend

Randolph Police Department
William Pace, Police Chief
41 South Main St.
Randolph, MA 02368

For Immediate Release

Friday, Dec. 29, 2017

Contact: John Guilfoil
Phone: 617-993-0003
Email: john@jgpr.net

Randolph Police Remind Residents to Remain Safe and Sober While Driving This New Year’s Weekend

RANDOLPH — With New Year’s celebrations and festivities coming up this weekend, Chief William Pace and the Randolph Police Department wish to emphasize the importance of remaining safe and sober while driving during the holidays.

“While we want everyone to enjoy themselves ringing in the new year, it is vital to the safety of our residents and community that people who are impaired never get behind the wheel,” Chief Pace said. “With the number of taxi cabs and ride-sharing services available, there is no excuse to drive under the influence.”

According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, 40 percent of traffic fatalities that occur during the holidays involve a driver who is alcohol-impaired, compared to 31 percent for the rest of the year. Mothers Against Drunk Driving reported that, in 2016, 48 percent of highway deaths on New Year’s Eve were alcohol related.

To keep travelers safe, Chief Pace offers the following safety tips from the National

Highway Traffic Safety Administration:

Buckle Up, Drive Sober and Pay Attention

  • Always wear your seat belt.
  • Never drive while intoxicated or if distracted. In every state, it is against the law to drive with a blood alcohol concentration of .08 or higher. Do not text while driving and always keep both hands on the wheel.
  • Be sure to have a designated driver to ensure that you and your family members are safe at all times in the motor vehicle.
  • If you see anyone with an alcoholic beverage, or if a person smells of alcohol, do not get into the car or let that person drive.

Plan Ahead

  • Utilize local taxi companies or ride-sharing services if you are impaired.
  • Plan your travel and route by checking the weather, road conditions, and traffic. Leave early, if necessary, and allow plenty of time to safely get to your destination.
  • Carry items in your vehicle that may prove useful in the event of an emergency or if you get stranded, including snow shovel, broom, ice scraper, jumper cables, flashlight, flares/emergency markers, blankets, mobile phone with charger, water, food and any necessary medicine.
  • If you become stranded, don’t run your vehicle with the windows up or in an enclosed space for an extended period of time to avoid asphyxiation from carbon monoxide poisoning. If you must run your vehicle, clear the exhaust pipe of any snow and run it only sporadically – just long enough to stay warm.

For additional tips and information please visit the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration website or call the Randolph Police Department at 781-963-1212.

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Randolph Police and Fire Departments Offer Safety Tips for Extreme Cold

For Immediate Release

Thursday, Dec. 28, 2017

Contact: John Guilfoil
Phone: 617-993-0003
Email: john@jgpr.net

*Joint Release*

Randolph Police and Fire Departments Offer Cold Weather Safety Tips

RANDOLPH — With extremely cold temperatures currently in New England, which are not expected to let up until some time in January, Fire Chief Richard Donovan and Police Chief William Pace would like to provide the community with several important safety tips.

According to the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency, daytime high temperatures will likely not rise above the teens from Thursday through the weekend, and high temperatures in some interior locations may not rise above the single digits. Overnight low temperatures will likely drop below zero.

The coldest periods are forecast to be Wednesday night into Thursday morning and Thursday night into Friday morning. Another bout of especially low wind chills is possible Saturday night into Sunday morning and Sunday night into Monday morning.

“When the temperatures dip this low, please be sure to check on your elderly neighbors and residents that may live by themselves,” Chief Donovan said. “In cold like this, it is vital to stay warm and wear multiple layers.”

With this type of weather, frostbite and hypothermia are possible for those without proper protection from the cold. To stay safe, the Randolph police and fire departments ask that residents follow these tips from the MEMA:

  • Minimize outdoor activities for the whole family, including pets.
  • If outside, dress in several layers of loose-fitting, lightweight clothing instead of a single heavy layer. Outer garments should be tightly woven and water repellent. Wear a hat, mittens (not gloves) and sturdy waterproof boots to protect your extremities. Cover your mouth with a scarf to protect your lungs.
  • Be a good neighbor. Check with elderly or disabled relatives and neighbors to ensure their safety.

Additionally, because of the extreme cold, other areas of your home and vehicles may be affected:

Possible increase in fires from unsafe/improper use of alternative heating sources or people trying to thaw frozen pipes with blowtorches or similar devices.

  • If you turn on a faucet and only a trickle comes out, suspect a frozen pipe. Locate the area of the water pipe that might be frozen. Likely places include pipes running against exterior walls or where your water service enters your home through the foundation.
  • Apply heat to the section of pipe using an electric heating pad wrapped around the pipe, an electric hair dryer, or wrapping pipes with towels soaked in hot water. Extreme care should be taken when utilizing any blowtorch, kerosene or propane heater, coal stove, wood stove or other open flame devices. All open flames in homes present a serious fire danger, as well as a severe risk of exposure to lethal carbon monoxide. Be sure to check that carbon monoxide detectors and smoke detectors are working properly.

Possible increase in incidents of carbon monoxide poisoning from unsafe/improper use of alternative heating sources.

  • Ensure you have sufficient heating fuel, as well as alternate emergency heating equipment in case you lose electricity. There are many resources available for low-income residents who meet certain requirements. National Grid and Eversource offer discounted rates on services to those who are eligible. The state’s Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program can help certain households pay for a portion of their heating bills.
  • When utilizing alternate heating sources, such as an emergency generator, your fireplace, wood stove, coal stove or space heater, make sure they are properly ventilated and always operate a generator outdoors and away from your home. Improper heating devices can lead to dangerous carbon monoxide buildup in the home.

Possible vehicle failure.

  • Make sure your car is properly winterized. Keep the gas tank at least half-full. Carry a winter emergency car kit including blankets, extra clothing, a flashlight with spare batteries, non-perishable foods, windshield scraper, shovel, sand, tow rope and jumper cables in the trunk.

“Try to stay indoors as much as possible in this frigid weather,” Chief Pace said. “There risk of frostbite substantially increases with long-term exposure to low temperatures.”

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Randolph Police Investigating Armed Home Invasion

Randolph Police Department
William Pace, Police Chief
41 South Main St.
Randolph, MA 02368

For Immediate Release

Monday, Dec. 18, 2017

Contact: John Guilfoil
Phone: 617-993-0003
Email: john@jgpr.net

Randolph Police Investigating Armed Home Invasion

RANDOLPH — Chief William Pace reports that the Randolph Police Department is investigating a report of an armed home invasion that took place Monday afternoon.

At approximately 1:15 p.m., Randolph Police received a 911 call from a 15-year-old boy who said he had been confronted by two masked men outside of his home on Lisa Road. The youth reported that one of the men had brandished a gun.

He told officers that he was at his mailbox outside of his home when the men walked up to him from behind.

They walked the boy into his home and one of the men stayed with him downstairs while the other went upstairs and rifled through multiple rooms. No one else was inside the home at the time.

The men reportedly stole a safe from a bedroom and then fled the area.

The boy told police that he believes the men fled in a black Honda with a third person inside.

The boy was not injured.

Randolph Police are actively investigating this incident. A preliminary investigation indicates that this was not a random act. Anyone with information is asked to the call the police station at 781-963-1212.

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Randolph Police Investigating Shooting Behind Apartment Complex

Randolph Police Department
William Pace, Police Chief
41 South Main St.
Randolph, MA 02368

For Immediate Release

Wednesday, Nov. 22, 2017

Contact: John Guilfoil
Phone: 617-993-0003
Email: john@jgpr.net

Randolph Police Investigating Shooting Behind Apartment Complex

26-Year-Old Male Victim Suffered What is Believed to be a Non-Life Threatening Injury

Shooting Does Not Appear to be Random

RANDOLPH — Chief William Pace reports that the Randolph Police Department is investigating a shooting that occurred in town Wednesday afternoon.

The incident occurred around 1:36 p.m. in a parking lot behind the apartment complex located at 28 Reed St. Randolph Police received multiple reports of a man suffering from a gunshot wound to the leg.

When officers arrived, they found a 26-year-old male Randolph resident with a gunshot wound to the upper thigh area on one of his legs. The man was taken by a Randolph Fire Department ambulance to a Boston hospital. His injury is believed to be serious, but non-life threatening.

The preliminary investigation indicates that this was not a random act. The suspect is believed to have fled the scene in a vehicle. No description of the vehicle or suspect is available at this time.

Randolph Police detectives are actively investigating this incident. As of 2:30 p.m., no arrests have been made.

Anyone with information about this incident is asked to call the Randolph Police Department at 781-963-1212.

The Norfolk County Crime Prevention and Control (CPAC) unit and State Police Crime Scene Services will be assisting the Randolph Police in their investigation.

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Randolph Police to Participate in No-Shave November

Randolph Police Department
William Pace, Police Chief
41 South Main St.
Randolph, MA 02368

For Immediate Release

Thursday, Oct. 26, 2017

Contact: John Guilfoil
Phone: 617-993-0003
Email: john@jgpr.net

Randolph Police to Participate in No-Shave November

RANDOLPH — Police Chief William Pace announces that the Randolph Police Department will be participating in No-Shave November to raise money for servicemen and women, veterans and their families.

For 30 days, Randolph police officers will be permitted to grow beards and goatees in exchange for donating $100 to Home Base, a partnership of the Red Sox Foundation and Massachusetts General Hospital that works to help service members, veterans and their families heal from invisible wounds — like traumatic brain injuries and post-traumatic stress disorder — regardless of their financial means or discharge status.

Home Base reported that in 2016, 500 first responders across 21 cities in Massachusetts raised more than $50,000 through the No-Shave November campaign.

“We’re thrilled to be raising money for Home Base and supporting service members and their families through a fun initiative like No-Shave November,” Chief Pace said. “I anticipate that many members of the Randolph Police Department will grow out their facial hair for this worthy cause.”

Residents who would like to support Home Base can do so by making a donation at homebase.org.

A ceremonial shave off will occur on Nov. 30, and the total donations from officers and community members will be sent to Home Base.

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*Media Advisory* Randolph Police Department to Host Child Safety Seat Checkpoint

Randolph Police Department
William Pace, Police Chief
41 South Main St.
Randolph, MA 02368

For Immediate Release

Wednesday, May 31, 2017

Contact: John Guilfoil
Phone: 617-993-0003
Email: john@jgpr.net

 

*Media Advisory*

Randolph Police Department to Host Child Safety Seat Checkpoint

RANDOLPH — Chief William Pace is pleased to announce that the Randolph Police Department will be hosting a child safety seat checkpoint this weekend.

WHEN:
Saturday, June 3, from noon to 4:00 p.m.

WHERE:
Randolph Police Station (rear lot), 41 South Main St.

WHO:
Randolph Police Department
WHAT:

Residents can bring their unused child safety seat and have it properly installed by certified public safety child safety seat installers, or bring a previously installed child safety seat to make sure it is installed correctly.

There will be a limited number of child safety seats available to replace broken, unsafe or expired safety seats for those in need on a first come first serve basis.

Additionally, the safety seat checkpoint will feature the Massachusetts State Police’s rollover simulator, which demonstrates the effects of not using a seatbelt or properly installed child safety seat.

“This is an incredibly important event to us,” Chief Pace said. “We want to make sure all residents with children are using properly secured child safety seats, and I hope parents will take this opportunity to check in and make sure their seats are installed the right way.”

About Child Safety Regulations:

All children riding as a passenger in motor vehicles must be in a federally-approved child passenger restraint that is properly fastened and secured until they are 8 years old or over 57 inches tall. Children older than 8 years old or taller than 57 inches then must wear seat belts. According to the Massachusetts Executive Office of Public Safety and Security, 75 percent of child safety seats are installed incorrectly.

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Randolph Police Arrest 15 In Connection with Major Drug Trafficking and Distribution Investigation

Randolph Police Department
William Pace, Police Chief
41 South Main St.
Randolph, MA 02368

For Immediate Release

Friday, March 24, 2017

Contact: John Guilfoil
Phone: 617-993-0003
Email: john@jgpr.net

Randolph Police Arrest 15 In Connection with Major Drug Trafficking and Distribution Investigation

RANDOLPH — Chief William Pace reports that the Randolph Police Department, working with the South Shore Drug Task Force, the Drug Enforcement Agency and Norfolk District Attorney Michael W. Morrissey, arrested 15 individuals following a large scale drug investigation that led to the confiscation of heroin, cocaine, cash, jewelry and several firearms.

In the early hours of Tuesday, March 21, more than 200 officers from more than 20 local and federal law enforcement agencies spread out across the South Shore and into Boston, searching 18 residences. The raids were the result of a six-month investigation in Norfolk, Plymouth and Suffolk counties, initiated by the Randolph Police Department.

Eight of the homes in the raid were in Randolph. The Randolph Police Department was the lead agency, working extensively with the South Shore Drug Task Force (comprised of officers from Randolph, Braintree, Quincy, Weymouth, Milton and Holbrook), the DEA and the Norfolk District Attorney’s Office.

The raids were executed without incident. Homes in Randolph included two on Avalon Drive (Avalon Bay), two in Chestnut West (Rosemont Square), one on Birch Drive, one on West Street, one on Green Street and one on Fitch Terrace.

As a result of the raids, more than 10,000 pills, including oxycodone and fentanyl, heroin and other drugs, cash, $100,000 in jewelry and 10 guns — seven of which were found in Randolph — were recovered.

Fifteen suspects were arrested and charged in Randolph:

CARL HENRY FRENCH, AGE 37, OF RANDOLPH is charged with:

    • Trafficking a Class B Drug (Oxycodone)
    • Trafficking a Class B Drug (Fentanyl)
    • Unlawful Possession of Ammunition
    • Monetary Laundering
    • Distributing a Class B Drug
    • Conspiracy to Violate the Drug Law (Three Counts)

FRENCH, who police believe led the drug enterprise at the center of the investigation, was found to be living a lavish lifestyle, allegedly off of the profits from the sales of heroin and other deadly drugs. He was found to be renting a Ferrari for $1,500 a day, taking frequent trips to Miami, and spending thousands at nightclubs in Miami and Boston.

HASHANNA RENNE WILLIAMS, AGE 32, OF RANDOLPH is charged with:

  • Monetary Laundering
  • Conspiracy to Violate the Drug Law

SHANTE MONIQUE GREEN, AGE 30, OF RANDOLPH is charged with:

  • Trafficking a Class A Drug (Heroin)
  • Trafficking a Class B Drug (Cocaine)
  • Possession of a Class D Drug with Intent to Distribute
  • Unlawful Possession of Ammunition

WILLIAM MELVIN PALMER JR., AGE 42, OF RANDOLPH is charged with Conspiracy to Violate the Controlled Substance Act

VINCENT FRANCIS BONANNO, AGE 27, OF RANDOLPH is charged with:

  • Conspiracy to Violate the Drug Law
  • Distributing a Class B Drug

OCTAVIO TALOC NARES, AGE 38, OF RANDOLPH is charged with:

  • Trafficking a Class A Drug (Heroin)
  • Trafficking a Class B Drug (Cocaine)
  • Possession of a Class D Drug with Intent to Distribute
  • Unlawful Possession of Ammunition
  • Distributing a Class B Drug (Oxycodone)

JAMES LAUREUS, AGE 37, OF MILTON is charged with Conspiracy to Violate the Drug Law

ROMEO ANDRADE, AGE 35, OF WEST BRIDGEWATER is charged with Conspiracy to Violate the Drug Law.

ALEX FRENCH, AGE 31, OF BROCKTON is charged with Conspiracy to Violate the Drug Law.

JEFFREY JOSEPH, AGE 27, OF BROCKTON  is charged with Conspiracy to Violate the Drug Law.

MICHAEL BERUBE, AGE 33, OF CARVER is charged with Conspiracy to Violate the Drug Law.

GARY ELLIOTT, AGE 30, OF BOSTON is charged with Distributing a Class B Drug

TYRONE THOMPSON, AGE 42, OF EAST BRIDGEWATER is charged with Conspiracy to Violate the Drug Law.

JEFFREY GRAHAM, AGE 35, OF QUINCY is charged with Conspiracy to Violate the Drug Law.

FELIX VALDES, AGE 46, OF MILTON is charged with Conspiracy to Violate the Drug Law.

“This investigation was complex and I commend all agencies that were involved for their professionalism and collaboration in getting these deadly drugs off our streets,” Chief Pace said. “Randolph will be safer tonight because of this operation. I thank the Norfolk District Attorney, the DEA, the South Shore Drug Task Force, the collaboration of local law enforcement in neighboring communities and the commitment of Randolph Police Investigators.”

All suspects were arraigned at Quincy District Court.

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