Randolph Police Charge Man Following Incident at Bank, Pursuit

Randolph Police Department
William Pace, Police Chief
41 South Main St.
Randolph, MA 02368

For Immediate Release

Tuesday, May 1, 2018

Contact: Benjamin Paulin
Phone: 781-428-3299
Email: ben@jgpr.net

Randolph Police Charge Man Following Incident at Bank, Pursuit

RANDOLPH — Chief William Pace reports that the Randolph Police Department has charged a man who allegedly tried to take money out of his grandmother’s bank account and then led officers on a pursuit Tuesday afternoon.

PATRICK LAUBENSTEIN, AGE 27, OF RANDOLPH was charged with:

  • Uttering a Forged Instrument
  • Abuse/Neglect of an Elderly Person
  • Operating to Endanger
  • Failure to Stop for Police

He also had multiple outstanding warrants for his arrest.

At approximately 1:30 p.m., Randolph Police received a call from an employee of Envision Bank, 129 North Main St., reporting that LAUBENSTEIN was in the drive-thru attempting to take money out of a bank account belonging to his grandmother.

The bank did not give him money and before police arrived at the bank LAUBENSTEIN fled.

Officers located his vehicle a short distance later and attempted to pull him over. He refused to stop and he was pursued through Randolph and eventually onto Route 24 and then I-93 northbound.

During the pursuit, police subsequently learned that LAUBENSTEIN had picked his grandmother up earlier in the day from a nursing home in Milford and drove her to the Randolph bank in an alleged attempt to have her take money out of her account.

When officers discovered that the 81-year-old woman was inside the fleeing car, the pursuit was immediately terminated.

Through the subsequent investigation, it was discovered that LAUBENSTEIN drove to a house on Hilltop Road in Milton. With the assistance of Milton Police and State Police LAUBENSTEIN was placed in custody.

LAUBENSTEIN’S grandmother was located safely outside of the Milton home, along with the vehicle.

The incident is still under investigation.

LAUBENSTEIN is expected to be arraigned Wednesday in Quincy District Court.

These are allegations. All suspects are innocent until proven guilty.

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*Night Update* Bristol, Plymouth, Norfolk County Police and Fire Chiefs Provide Update on Today’s Nor’easter

For Immediate Release
Tuesday, March 13, 2018

Contact: Benjamin Paulin
Phone: 781-428-3299
Email: ben@jgpr.net

*Joint Release*

Bristol, Plymouth Norfolk County Police and Fire Chiefs Provide Update on Today’s Nor’easter

Police and fire chiefs from Attleboro, Bridgewater, Canton, East Bridgewater, Easton, Holbrook, Randolph, Raynham, Taunton and Whitman would like to provide residents with an evening update on where the communities stand regarding today’s storm since the update from this afternoon.

Please note that some communities have opened up warming shelters.

Snow has steadily been falling throughout the day and the blizzard warning issued by the National Weather Service was scheduled to end at 8 p.m. Snowfall is expected to be done in the region between midnight and 2 a.m. Wednesday.

As of 8 p.m., there were about 191,000 residents in the state without power, according to the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) outage map.

Now that it is dark, residents are still urged to stay off the roads as some areas are experiencing near-whiteout conditions.

Anyone who has an emergency should call 911.

ATTLEBORO

Fire Chief Scott. T. Lachance reports that there were about 2,000 residents without power as of 7 p.m. National Grid crews were in the city working to restore electricity.

A warming station will is open at the South Attleboro fire station, 1476 South Ave. Use the shelter to charge cell phones and electronic devices and to stay warm if you are without power. Anyone with questions about the warming station can call the Attleboro Fire Department at 508-222-2325.

While there have been multiple trees and wires down, almost all roads in Attleboro are currently open.

BRIDGEWATER

Police Chief Christopher Delmonte reports that the police department responded to approximately 50 storm-related calls beginning at 8 a.m. today. The fire department also responded to a similar number of calls.

As of 7:30 p.m. there were 687 residents without power. At the height of the storm the town had over 3,000 outages.

CANTON

Fire Chief Charles Doody reports that Canton had about 25 power outages as of 7:30 p.m.

In total, the fire department responded to 10 calls for service throughout the day.

EAST BRIDGEWATER

Police Chief Scott Allen and Fire Chief Timothy Harhen report that the police and fire departments responded to nearly 60 calls for service in relation to the storm beginning at 7:30 a.m. today.

Most of the calls were for road hazards, such as fallen trees and wires. The fire department provided mutual aid to West Bridgewater for a structure fire this afternoon and went to another call for burned food.

National Grid was in town actively working to restore about 618 outages as of 7:30 p.m.

Residents needing shelter for the night can go to a Red Cross regional shelter at the First Congregational Church at 254 Main St. in Plympton or the Plymouth North High School at 41 Obery St. in Plymouth.

While all roads are currently open and passable in town, residents are warned to use extreme caution and only drive if it is absolutely necessary.

EASTON

Fire Chief Kevin Partridge and Police Chief Gary Sullivan report that progress is being made in trying to get the number of power outages in Easton down. As of 5:40 p.m. there were about 1,900 residents without power. By 7:30 p.m that number was down to 866. National Grid has more than a dozen crews working in town.

The warming center at the Richardson-Olmsted Elementary School, 101 Lothrop St., will be open until 10 p.m. tonight. For details about the warming center or if you are in need of assistance, call the Easton Fire Department at 508-230-3311.

There were still a dozen streets in town that were closed because of road hazards as of 7:30 p.m.

HOLBROOK

Police Chief William Smith reports that Holbrook had three car crashes throughout the day — two where drivers collided with plow trucks and another where a driver struck a utility pole. None of the crashes resulted in serious injury.

As of 7:30 p.m. there were about 35 residents without power, according the MEMA outage map.

RANDOLPH

Police Chief William Pace reports as of 7:30 p.m. only about 160 residents in town did not have electricity. Crews were working to make repairs.

Most of the calls for service that the police department responded to were for fallen trees and downed wires.

RAYNHAM

Police Chief James Donovan reports that the police department responded to three crashes throughout the day, including one where a driver collided with a plow truck on Route 138. None of the crashes resulted in serious injury.

Chief Donovan says that if residents must drive, they should be aware that the road surfaces are inconsistent and uneven and to use caution. He also warns that wind and snow drifts have cause some stop signs and traffic lights to be covered with snow.

Fire Chief James Januse reports that Raynham still has a small amount of scattered power outages throughout town. There are four roads in Raynham that are currently blocked with fallen trees and wires.

In total, the police department responded to 58 calls for service and the fire department went to 26 calls as of 7:30 p.m.

TAUNTON

Fire Chief Timothy Bradshaw reports that the fire department spent most of the day responding to downed trees and wires. There were also multiple crashes and a number of medical calls, some related to shoveling and snow blowing.

There are still areas without power in the city, but all issues were being addressed in a timely manner.

The fire department is currently staffing six engines and two ladders with a total of 30 firefighters tonight, which is about eight more than are on-duty than on a typical day.

WHITMAN

Fire Chief Timothy Grenno reports that the Whitman Fire Department dealt with a variety of issues throughout the day including multiple fallen utility poles, trees that fell on cars and trees blocking roads.

As of 7:30 p.m. there was about 1 percent of the town without power.

A warming center will be opening up at the Whitman-Hanson Regional High School at 9 a.m. for residents who need to utilize it.

Chief Grenno asks that residents shovel out fire hydrants that are near homes, which will help in the event of a fire.

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*Joint Release* Bristol, Plymouth Norfolk County Police and Fire Chiefs Provide Update on Today’s Nor’easter

For Immediate Release
Tuesday, March 13, 2018

Contact: Benjamin Paulin
Phone: 781-428-3299
Email: ben@jgpr.net

*Joint Release*

Bristol, Plymouth Norfolk County Police and Fire Chiefs Provide Update on Today’s Nor’easter

Police and fire chiefs from Attleboro, Bridgewater, Canton, East Bridgewater, Easton, Holbrook, Randolph, Raynham, Taunton and Whitman would like to provide residents with an afternoon update on how the communities are faring with today’s nor’easter.

The region lies in what is considered the “Jackpot Area,” which weather forecasters predict will receive the most amount of snowfall from the storm.

By 1 p.m. today much of the region has seen heavy snowfall and high wind speeds. Snow is expected to continue to fall steadily into Tuesday night, according to the National Weather Service.

According to the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) outage map, there were about 180,000 residents without power as of 1 p.m.

If you have an emergency call 911.

ATTLEBORO

Fire Chief Scott. T. Lachance reports that the city has been largely unaffected by power outages thus far. Chief Lachance is in contact with the city’s National Grid liaison regarding the 20 or so outages reported and they are being worked on.

Residents have been heeding the warnings about staying off the roads, making things easier for public safety vehicles and plows to operate.

The fire department provided mutual aid to Seekonk for a fire earlier this morning.

BRIDGEWATER

Police Chief Christopher Delmonte reports that the town has received numerous calls for fallen trees and downed wires since 7 a.m.

As of 1 p.m., Bridgewater had about 1,500 residents without power, according to the MEMA outage map.

Visibility was extremely limited with near-whiteout conditions.

CANTON

Fire Chief Charles Doody reports that the storm has had a limited impact on Canton as of 1 p.m. Tuesday.

Only six power outages were actively being worked on and the fire department responded to four storm-related calls for service.

Chief Doody reports that the town’s DPW is doing a good job keeping the roads open and that most people have heeded the warnings of staying off the roads.

EAST BRIDGEWATER

Police Chief Scott Allen reports that since 8 a.m. East Bridgewater Police have responded to 22 calls for service, including 14 calls for road hazards, trees down or wires down.

There are additional police cruisers strategically setup around town to be able to safely respond to calls for service. But residents should note that it may take additional time to respond safely to calls.

As of 1 p.m. about more than 600 residents in town were without power, particularly in the area of Robins Pond. The traffic lights in the center of town went down mid-morning and are still without power. National Grid has crews in town working to restore electricity.

Residents are urged to stay off the roads to allow DPW workers to clear the roadways safely.

EASTON

Fire Chief Kevin Partridge reports that as of 1 p.m. there were about 1,600 residents without power.

The fire department has received more than 48 calls for trees and/or wires down throughout the town. One tree went through the roof of a mobile home and the resident was displaced.

There are also 13 road closures currently.  Police are standing by at several areas with downed wires and trees.  Police Chief Sullivan is encouraging everyone to stay off the roads to allow the plows to continue to work and increase the safety for first responders as they handle calls for service.

A warming center has been opened at the Richardson-Olmsted Elementary School, 101 Lothrop St. Residents can use the shelter to charge their phones and electronic devices and stay warm. For more details about the warming center or if you are in need of assistance, call the Easton Fire Department at 508-230-3311.

HOLBROOK

Police Chief William Smith reports that Holbrook has gotten about six or seven inches of snow thus far and it is continuing to come down steadily.

Earlier this morning a tree fell down and hit a house on Holly Road. There were no injuries and the residents were able to stay inside the home.

There were only about five homes in town without power as of 1 p.m., according to MEMA’s outage map.

RANDOLPH

Police Chief William Pace reports that a tree fell onto a house on Mark Terrace Tuesday morning. No injuries were reported.

As of 1 p.m. the town had about 150 residents without power due to the storm.

Chief Pace urges residents to stay off the roads.

RAYNHAM

Fire Chief James Januse reports that Raynham has had scattered power outages throughout town. As of 1 p.m., the Taunton Municipal Lighting Plant website listed about 15 streets in town where outages had been reported.

The town’s highway department has been doing a great job of clearing the roads, Chief Januse said.

There have been fallen trees in town but no injuries reported.

Police Chief James Donovan reports that the police department has responded to 43 calls for service, including a three-car crash on Route 138. Chief Donovan notes that residents have done a good job staying off the roads today.

TAUNTON

The City of Taunton declared a State of Emergency Tuesday morning and residents are urged to stay in their homes.

Fire Chief Timothy Bradshaw reports that the Taunton Fire Department has responded to more than 50 calls for service since 6 a.m. in the city.

Most of the calls were for fallen trees and wires. There were also multiple motor vehicle crashes.

The fire department is coordinating with the Parks and Recreation Department to remove fallen trees from roadways.

The Taunton Municipal Lighting Plant has over 75 streets in Taunton where outages have been reported.

Chief Bradshaw will be adding additional apparatus to be in commission from 2 p.m. through midnight, as he anticipates the call volume to increase as the day goes on.

WHITMAN

Fire Chief Timothy Grenno reports that the Whitman Fire Department has been dealing with a variety of issues today including multiple fallen utility poles, trees that fell on cars and trees blocking roads. They have responded to 25 emergency calls since 8 a.m.

As of 1 p.m., there were only about 250 residents without power, according to the MEMA outage map.

Chief Grenno asks that residents who have emergencies to call 911 and not the department’s business line. They will be able to track the calls and dispatch necessary services better.

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Randolph Police Department Advises Residents Ahead of Third Nor’easter

Randolph Police Department
William Pace, Police Chief
41 South Main St.
Randolph, MA 02368

For Immediate Release

Monday, March 12, 2018

Contact: Benjamin Paulin
Phone: 781-428-3299
Email: ben@jgpr.net

Randolph Police Department Advises Residents Ahead of Third Nor’easter

RANDOLPH — After handling the first two nor’easters that hit the region in recent weeks, Chief William Pace is advising Randolph residents to prepare for yet another winter storm.

The National Weather Service has issued a hazardous weather outlook and winter storm warning for Norfolk, Plymouth and Bristol counties, noting the potential for blizzard-like conditions and heavy snowfall beginning Monday night and continuing throughout the day Tuesday.

Randolph could see between 13 and 23 inches of snow, according to the National Weather Service. Temperatures during the storm are expected to be between 33 and 28 degrees. Wind gusts could reach speeds of up to 46 mph.

“With the significant amount of snow that is expected, we ask our residents to plan accordingly for any potential power outages to homes and businesses,” Chief Pace said. “If it is safe to do so, please check on your elderly and disabled neighbors who may need assistance before, during and after the storm.”

BEFORE THE STORM

  • Residents should be prepared for power outages and stock up on batteries for flashlights or battery powered lanterns. If using candles, keep them away from anything flammable and never leave them unattended.
  • Keep cell phones, laptops and tablets charged as much as possible. Consider an external battery for your devices.
  • Neighbors should talk with one another and set up plans to assist those who may be at risk and/or in need of help.

DURING THE STORM

  • Stay off the roads and stay indoors, if possible. Give plow and sand/salt trucks the space they need to operate.
  • If your power goes out during the storm, contact National Grid at 800-465-1212 to report an outage.
  • To report a gas leak, call 911. Residents can also contact Columbia Gas at 800-525-8222 for gas-related issues.
  • Follow the Randolph Fire Department on their  Facebook page and  Twitter account updates during and after the storm. The police and fire stations will be open throughout the storm. If you have an emergency, call 911.

AFTER THE STORM

  • Clear snow from any gas vents attached to your home.
  • Assist the fire department by shoveling out any hydrants near your home.
  • Do not go near or drive over any downed power lines.
  • Check your property for any trees that could be in danger of falling near your home or vehicles.
  • As the snow begins to melt, clear any debris from storm drains near your home to allow water to drain.
  • Do not pump water from sump pumps into the road. The water can freeze and cause hazardous conditions if the temperature dips.

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Randolph Police and Fire Teach First Responders Course at Randolph High School

Randolph Police Department
William Pace, Police Chief
41 South Main St.
Randolph, MA 02368

For Immediate Release

Friday, Jan. 19, 2018

Contact: Benjamin Paulin
Phone: 781-428-3299
Email: ben@jgpr.net

Randolph Police and Fire Teach First Responders Course at Randolph High School

RANDOLPH — Police Chief William Pace and Fire Chief Richard F. Donovan are pleased to announce that the police and fire departments are in their fifth year of conducting their First Responders course at Randolph High School. 

Led by police detective Kristen Gagnon and fire lieutenants Joseph Messia and Michael Austrino, the course is offered to Randolph High School juniors and seniors who are interested in pursuing careers in law enforcement, fire services, healthcare or emergency services.

Designed to allow the students to learn and gain hands-on experience in these fields, the the year-long course focuses on topics such as fire science, fire safety, emergency medical services, policing and law.

The 15 student class is selected through an interview process at the beginning of the school year and students are selected based on interest, attendance and character.

“We take a lot of pride in the way we conduct this course,” Detective Gagnon said. “Lt. Messia, Lt. Austrino and I try to make the class as hands-on as possible and give students a realistic view of the industry while also helping and encouraging them to pursue whatever area they’re passionate about.”

The police portion of the course teaches students about motor vehicle laws, Miranda rights, constitutional laws, hate crimes, abuse and more.

The firefighting section of the course teaches students the science behind fire and its behavior, firefighter gear, engine company operations, vehicle extrication, search and rescue and the process of becoming a firefighter.

Students are also taught about EMS topics that include, first aid, proper protective equipment, poisoning and overdose, psychological emergencies and suicide prevention. Additionally, all students leave the course CPR certified.

The program includes a local jail tour and students participate in an interactive experience with MILO Range Theater System. The MILO system provides a fully immersive training environment where students are put in situations where they will need to make quick decisions.

Firefighting activities include putting out small fires, practicing responding to calls and learning how extrication tools work.

In the coming weeks, the students will visit elementary schools to talk to the children about CPR and what to do if someone is choking.

At the end of the program, the students will participate in a car crash simulation. The simulation allows students to practice skills they learned throughout the year in the First Responders course.

For more information about the course, contact the Randolph High School at 781-961-6220.

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Randolph Police Identify Driver Who Died in Motor Vehicle Crash

Randolph Police Department
William Pace, Police Chief
41 South Main St.
Randolph, MA 02368

For Immediate Release

Thursday, Jan. 18, 2018

Contact: Benjamin Paulin
Phone: 781-428-3299
Email: ben@jgpr.net

Randolph Police Identify Driver Who Died in Motor Vehicle Crash

RANDOLPH —  The Randolph Police Department is releasing the name of the man  killed in yesterday’s fatal crash.

MICHAEL BERG, AGE 37, OF HOLBROOK died after colliding head-on with a vehicle on Union Street in Randolph Wednesday afternoon.

BERG, who was a suspect in an armed robbery at a Randolph convenience store, was fleeing from police when he crashed.

The crash and robbery remain under investigation by Randolph Police, with the assistance of the Norfolk District Attorney’s office.

Anyone with information about either incident is asked to call the Randolph Police Department at 781-963-1212.

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Randolph Police Investigating Motor Vehicle Crash after Armed Robbery

Randolph Police Department
William Pace, Police Chief
41 South Main St.
Randolph, MA 02368

For Immediate Release

Wednesday, Jan. 17, 2018

Contact: Benjamin Paulin
Phone: 781-428-3299
Email: ben@jgpr.net

Randolph Police Investigating Motor Vehicle Crash after Armed Robbery

This is breaking news. Additional information will be provided when it is available. Media should stage at the Randolph Police Department, 41 South Main St.

RANDOLPH — Commander John Hamelburg reports that the Randolph Police Department is investigating a serious motor vehicle crash that is believed to be connected to an armed robbery that occurred earlier Wednesday afternoon.

At approximately 3 p.m., a suspect walked into Super Mart, located at 1151 North Main St., armed with a sawed-off shotgun and demanding money from the clerk. During the robbery, the suspect fired the shotgun into the floor of the store. No one was injured, and the store clerk was the only other person in the store at the time of the incident. The suspect escaped by vehicle with a quantity of cash.

Randolph Police broadcast a description of the suspect and of a blue 2009 Pontiac G6 sedan. Shortly afterward, the Holbrook Police Department located a vehicle matching the description given over the air being driven by a man matching the description given of the robbery suspect.

Holbrook Police attempted to stop the vehicle, but the driver fled, leading police on a pursuit from Holbrook and eventually back into Randolph. At approximately 4:30 p.m., the pursuit ended when the suspect crashed head-on into another vehicle near 306 Union St.

The suspect sustained serious, life-threatening injuries and was taken to an area hospital.

The male driver of the other vehicle was transported to an area hospital with injuries that are not believed to be life threatening.

This is a breaking news update. This situation is being actively investigated by the Randolph Police Department and the Norfolk County District Attorney’s Office has been requested to the scene.

Anyone with information about this incident is asked to call the Randolph Police Department at 781-963-1212.

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Randolph Police Department Shares Ice Dam and Snow Removal Safety Tips for Residents

Randolph Police Department
William Pace, Police Chief
41 South Main St.
Randolph, MA 02368

For Immediate Release

Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018

Contact: Benjamin Paulin
Phone: 781-428-3299
Email: ben@jgpr.net

Randolph Police Department Shares Ice Dam and Snow Removal Safety Tips for Residents

RANDOLPH — After last week’s heavy snowfall and with warmer temperatures expected over the next several days, Chief William Pace would like to advise Randolph residents on how they can safely handle snow removal from roofs and avoid damage from ice dams.

With some areas experiencing over a foot of snow, it is important for property owners, managers and tenants to have snow and ice cleared from their roofs before any future rain or snowfall.

While removing snow, residents should be cognizant of the dangers that come with heavy snow loads and the importance of recognizing signs of structural weakness. Flat and low pitched roofs are at the highest risk of buckling under heavy snow and ice accumulations, however many risks posed by heavy snowfall on roofs can be avoided by safely removing the snow.

With temperatures expected to reach around 50 degrees by the end of this week, residents should also be wary of snow that has accumulated around gutters, as it could contribute to ice dams and damage from water leaking into walls, ceilings, insulation and other areas.

“With the snow beginning to melt from last week’s blizzard, we want to ensure that residents stay safe and keep their property protected,” Chief Pace said. “The following tips can help people to recognize potential problems with their roofs.”

The following safety tips from the Massachusetts Department of Public Safety (DPS), the Department of Fire Services (DFS) and the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) outline how to safely remove snow from roofs, recognize structural damage and other important safety information.

HOW TO REMOVE SNOW FROM ROOFS

  • Consider hiring snow removal professionals. The combination of height and ice can make removing snow from roofs dangerous. If you decide to perform the task yourself, make sure you have someone with you to assist.
  • Use a snow rake to remove snow from pitched roofs and start from the edge.
  • Try to shave the snow down 2 or 3 inches on the roof instead of scraping the roof clean which could damage shingles or other roof covering.
  • Keep all ladders, roof rakes and shovels away from utility wires.
  • Plastic shovels are usually the best as metal tools may cause damage to your roof.
  • Shovel snow from flat roofs by throwing the snow over the side and away from the building.
  • Remove large icicles carefully if they’re hanging over doors and walkways. Consider knocking down icicles through windows using a broomstick.
  • Protect gas and electric meters and piping from falling snow, icicles and melting water.
  • Keep gutters and drains clean, free of ice and snow and keep downspouts clean at ground level

DO NOT

  • Do not add your weight or the weight of equipment to the roof.
  • Do not use a ladder, as ice tends to build up on both the rungs of the ladder and the soles of your boots.
  • Do not use blow torches, open-flame, electric heating devices, or heat guns to remove snow and ice.
  • Do not try to remove ice or icicles from utility wires or meters. Call your utility company for assistance.

HOW TO RECOGNIZE PROBLEMS WITH ROOFS

  • Sagging roofs
  • Severe roof leaks
  • Cracked or split wood members
  • Bends or ripples in supports
  • Cracks in walls or masonry
  • Sheared off screws from steel frames
  • Sprinkler heads that have dropped down below ceiling tiles
  • Doors that pop open
  • Doors or windows that are difficult to open
  • Bowed utility pipes or conduit attached at ceiling
  • Creaking, cracking or popping sounds

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Randolph Police Officer Kevin Gilbert Recognized for Selfless Efforts Beyond the Call of Duty

Randolph Police Department
William Pace, Police Chief
41 South Main St.
Randolph, MA 02368

For Immediate Release

Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018

Contact: John Guilfoil
Phone: 617-993-0003
Email: john@jgpr.net

Randolph Police Officer Kevin Gilbert Recognized for Selfless Efforts Beyond the Call of Duty

On Duty and Off Shift, Officer Gilbert Consistently Goes the Extra Mile for his Fellow Citizens

RANDOLPH — The main reason Kevin Gilbert became a police officer was to help others. Consistently, while on duty and on his own time, Officer Gilbert has been the living embodiment of service and selflessness.

For the reasons outlined below and many other untold examples, the Randolph Police Department recently awarded Officer Gilbert a commendation, and the department is sharing his story with the public so that they too will know and understand just how far police officers like Officer Gilbert go for their fellow man.

When he leaves work at the end of his shift, Officer Gilbert constantly scours social media and news headlines for people who are in need that he may be able to help.

His efforts have helped many people at home and in places as far away as Georgia and Tennessee. Officer Gilbert has sent care packages to sick children in hospitals. If a sick child has siblings, he buys them toys and other gifts, because he understands that the siblings suffer too. He buys the parents gift cards for gas to help them get back and forth to the hospital. All of this comes out of his own pocket.

Last month, Officer Gilbert found a post on Facebook about a local family in need and bought toys for the children and arranged to have them given to their parents to put under the tree for Christmas morning.

“Officer Gilbert is a shining example of the community policing we do here in Randolph,” Chief William Pace said. “He has only been with the department for three years and his impact in town has already been felt by many.”

Recently, his commanding officer, Sgt. Douglas Morgan wrote a letter of commendation to Chief Pace making him aware of some of the great things Officer Gilbert has been doing in his free time.

“I was present on a call with Officer Gilbert where a mother had shoplifted some food at [a local pharmacy]. She was a single mother, money was tight, and she was trying to provide for her daughter,” Sgt. Morgan wrote. “Officer Gilbert went back into the store and paid for enough food for a couple of days out of his own pocket until her social security check came.”

Officer Gilbert says he learned to help others from his parents growing up in Randolph and while he was training at the police academy in Boston.

“As a police officer making an arrest is one thing in the course of our duties, but by sending a letter and gift with a police patch to a sick child in the hospital, you can do the most with that,” Officer Gilbert said. “I’m certainly not the only officer in our department who does it, but it’s always nice to be able to help whenever we can.”

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