Randolph Police Department Distributes Bicycle Helmets to Children, Thanks Local Law Firm for Donation

Chief Anthony Marag is pleased to share that the Randolph Police Department received dozens of bicycle helmets from law firm Breakstone, White & Gluck and distributed the donated helmets to local children over the weekend.

The Boston-based personal injury law firm donated the helmets as part of its Project KidSafe campaign to encourage safe cycling and prevent head injuries.

The helmets were given away to Randolph children ages 12 and younger at the police station on Saturday, June 26 as part of the department’s bicycle safety program. Approximately 90 helmets were given to kids.

“Breakstone, White & Gluck has donated dozens of helmets to us for several years, and we are grateful for their dedication to keeping kids safe,” Chief Marag said. “Wearing a helmet is a good practice for children as it provides them with a vital layer of protection that helps to ensure their safety while they ride their bicycles.”

The Project KidSafe campaign was started by the law firm in 2013 as a way to reduce injuries and encourage children to wear helmets as soon as they start riding. Since 2013, the firm has donated 30,000 new bike helmets to children across Massachusetts.

Massachusetts law requires children who are 16 years old and younger to wear bicycle helmets when they ride. The Randolph Police Department encourages all cyclists to wear helmets no matter their age.

To learn more about Project KidSafe, visit www.bwglaw.com/bikes.

 

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Randolph Police Department Thanks Community Partners, Residents for Holiday Gift Donations

Chief William Pace and the Randolph Police Department would like to thank several community organizations and partners that have donated items over the past several weeks for the department to distribute to families in Randolph this season.

The Randolph Police Department would like to thank residents, as well as Ocean State Job Lot, Orangetheory Fitness of Dedham and the Stoughton Police Department.

Ocean State Job Lot donated an $800 gift card that was used to purchase clothes and other essential items for school children and their family members. The department would like to thank Jim Black, J.R. Mitchell, Keith Cruz and Daniekqun Reddick of Ocean State Job Lot.

Orangetheory Fitness of Dedham held a toy drive at their gym. Owner Kerri Bliss and Manager Michelee Chery donated the toys from the drive to the department.

The Stoughton Police Department conducted a toy drive as well and donated some of what it had collected to the Randolph Police Department’s toy drive. The department would like to thank Stoughton Police Sgt. Nate Derby, Officer Matthew Gada and Officer Michael Connolly.

The donations, paired with donations from residents to the Randolph Police Toys for Tots drive, allowed the department to donate toys, clothes and other essential items to dozens of families between all of the schools in the Randolph Public Schools. The items were distributed by officers to the various schools in the district on Monday, Dec. 21.

“We’d like to thank each of these community partners for their valuable contributions to this year’s drive, as well as our residents for their donations and continued support of our community,” Chief Pace said. “The donations helped us to give toys and other important supplies to many families in Randolph this season.”

The department would also like to thank the Randolph Public Schools staff and Kimberly Duane of the district administration for their assistance with distribution.

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Randolph Police Department Reminds Residents that Use of Fireworks is Illegal in Massachusetts

As the Fourth of July and summer celebrations approach, Chief William Pace and the Randolph Police Department would like to remind residents that the use of fireworks is illegal in Massachusetts. 

It is illegal to use, possess or sell fireworks of any kind in Massachusetts, including Class C fireworks, which are sometimes falsely called “safe and sane fireworks.” Class C fireworks include sparklers, party poppers, snappers, firecrackers, spinners, cherry bombs and more. Additionally, residents are prohibited from purchasing fireworks elsewhere and transporting them into the state.

The Randolph Police Department will be adding special patrols over the coming weeks to respond to late night illegal fireworks activity in the town. Residents can make fireworks complaints at 781-963-1212. Residents should not wait to call or reach out on social media.

From 2010-2019, 858 major fires and explosions were reported to the Massachusetts Fire Incident Reporting System (MFIRS) due to the use of illegal fireworks. These incidents caused 12 civilian injuries, 40 firefighter injuries and a loss of approximately $2.9 million.

The Randolph Police Department recommends that residents only attend displays put on by a licensed professional to ensure safety.

“While fireworks displays are a fun and entertaining way to spend your time outdoors during the summer, they often pose serious risks when not handled properly,” said Chief Pace. “Only licensed professionals should handle fireworks. Any fireworks, including sparklers, fire crackers and cherry bombs, can not be used by residents in Massachusetts.”

Residents should always: 

  • Watch fireworks displays from a safe distance.
  • Call 911 if anyone gets injured by fireworks.
  • Set a positive example for children by not using illegal fireworks. If kids see adults using them, they may not realize the dangers and could be encouraged to pick up matches or lighters.
  • Be careful around even the smallest fireworks. Sparklers burn at 1,800 degrees and could easily cause severe burns and injuries.

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, the misuse of fireworks can cause death and injuries including severe burns, contusions, lacerations, eye injuries and more. 

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Randolph Police Department Reminds Residents of Upcoming Hands-Free Law for Drivers

RANDOLPH — Chief William Pace and the Randolph Police Department would like to remind residents of the upcoming hands-free law for drivers.

On Feb. 23, An Act Requiring the Hands-Free Use of Mobile Telephones While Driving will go into effect prohibiting drivers from using cellphones and other hand-held devices while operating a vehicle. There will be a grace period through March 31 in which drivers will get a warning for their first violation rather than a fine.

The law states that no motor vehicle operator may use electronic devices while driving unless the technology is being used hands-free. Operators found to be texting, dialing phone numbers or using a phone with their hands in any capacity while driving will be fined.

Operators are permitted to use hands-free technology including Bluetooth, “single tap or swipe” to activate or deactivate hands-free mode, navigation technology mounted to the car’s dash and phone use in emergency situations. Drivers may use their phones if they are stationary and not in an active traffic lane.

The penalty for drivers who are found guilty of violating the hands-free law is a $100 fine for a first offense, a $250 fine for a second offense and a $500 fine for a third or subsequent offense. Operators who commit a second or subsequent offense are also required to complete an educational program focused on distracted driving prevention. A third or subsequent violation will count as a surchargeable incident which can affect the driver’s insurance rates.

The act also includes a requirement that law enforcement agencies report data on violations. The data collected by law enforcement will be available to the public.

The law does not apply to first responders who are on duty and driving emergency service vehicles.

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